The Name "Earth"

The Name "Earth"


Earth is the only planet whose name in English is not derived from a Greco-Roman God.


share Share

April 22 is Earth Day. The English name, from the 15th century, for the planet we inhabit, came from the Old English eor?e, meaning both “ground, soil, dirt, dry land; country, the district” and “the material world, the abode of man”, which descended from the Proto-Germanic er? ?, from the Proto-Indo-European root er- (“earth”, “ground”).
Earth is the only planet in our solar system not named after a Greco-Roman deity. The name used in Western academia during the Renaissance was Tellus Mater or Terra Mater, the Latin for “earth mother”, i.e. “Mother Earth”, god­dess of the earth in ancient Roman religion and mytho­logy. From the Latin terra – with origins in the Proto-Indo-European ters-, meaning “dry” – the Romance langu­ages derived their word for Earth, including the French La Terre, Italian La Terra, and Spanish La Tierra.


Oceans

Earth's oceans are so large and deep, humans have only explored 5% of them.

Read More
Earth's Visibility

The Earth, seen from the moon, also goes through phases.

Read More
Earth's Density

Earth is the densest planet in the Solar System.

Read More
Mount Tambora Eruption

In 1815, Mount Tambora in Indonesia erupted (believed to be the largest eruption of all time), creating a crater on its top 2,000 feet deep after it blew off 4,000 feet of the mountain.

Read More