Babies And Shivering

Babies And Shivering


Newborn babies don't shiver from the cold. It could be a sign of seizures or low blood sugar levels.


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When the temperature drops below a level your body finds comfortable, you may start to shiver. Visible shivering can boost your body’s surface heat production by about 500 percent.

Shivering can only warm you up for so long, though. After a few hours, your muscles will run out of glucose (sugar) for fuel and will grow too tired to contract and relax.

Each person has their temperature at which shivering starts. For example, children without much body fat to insulate them may begin shivering in response to warmer temperatures than an adult with more body fat.

You probably don’t remember a time when you didn’t or couldn’t shiver. That’s because the only time in your life when you don’t shiver is at the beginning.

Babies don’t shiver when they’re cold because they have another temperature-regulation response. Babies actually warm up by burning fat in a process called thermogenesis. It’s similar to how hibernating animals survive and keep warm in the winter.

If you see a baby shivering or shaking, it could be a sign of low blood sugar. Your baby may simply be hungry and in need of energy.


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