Samuel Reshevsky

Samuel Reshevsky


Samuel Reshevsky learned to play chess at age four and was soon acclaimed as a child prodigy. At age eight, he was beating many accomplished players with ease and giving simultaneous exhibitions.


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Samuel Herman Reshevsky was a Polish chess prodigy and later a leading American chess grandmaster. He was never a full-time chess professional. He was a strong contender for the World Chess Championship from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s: he tied for third place in the 1948 World Chess Championship tournament and tied for second in the 1953 Candidates Tournament.

He was an eight-time winner of the US Chess Championship, tying him with Bobby Fischer for the all-time record. An outstanding match player throughout his career, Reshevsky excelled at positional play and could be a brilliant tactician when required. He took a long time over his opening moves, and often found himself in time pressure, but this sometimes unsettled his opponent more than it did Reshevsky.

Reshevsky was a tough and forceful player who was superb at positional play, but could also play brilliant tactical chess when warranted. He often used huge amounts of time in the opening, a dangerous tactic that sometimes forced him to play the rest of the game in a very short amount of time. That sometimes unsettled Reshevsky's opponents, but at other times resulted in blunders on his part.


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