Salvador Dalí

Salvador Dalí


Salvador Dalí was expelled from the same art school not once, but twice.


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In 1922 Dalí gained admission to the Academy. He enjoyed the freedom of selfexpression he felt in Madrid, and developed close relationships with several of his fellow students including Federico García Lorca and Luis Buñuel (two artists he would later collaborate with).

Dalí experimented with several avant-garde painting styles, primarily Cubism, Futurism and Purism, which he learned about through reproductions in art journals. He began showing his work in galleries in Barcelona and Madrid and had two solo exhibitions, as well as showing his work in several other exhibitions with other Catalan modernists. Though he was experiencing success in the Spanish art world, Dalí felt unchallenged by his instructors at the Academy. His tendency to challenge the authority of the Academy and to encourage his peers to do the same, led to disciplinary actions and eventually to his dismissal in 1926.

Following his dismissal, Dalí returned to Figueres and devoted himself to painting. He continued to exhibit with the Catalan avant-garde, but his works displayed an increasingly disturbing imagery of mutilation and decay. Even the Catalan art community became more and more horrified by his graphic depictions, and as a result galleries in Madrid and Barcelona began to exclude Dalí from exhibitions.


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