George Washington's Teeth

George Washington's Teeth


George Washington's teeth were made of elephant ivory and walrus tusks.


share Share

In fact, Washington had multiple sets of dentures, and they were made of ivory, metal alloys and -most disturbingly- the teeth of other humans, quite possibly slaves. According to the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association, Washington's documents show that he purchased toothbrushes and tooth powders beginning at least in his early 20s, but to no avail. His first tooth was pulled in 1756, when he was just 24. By 1781, Washington was wearing partial dentures, and by 1789, he had only one tooth left in his mouth. That year, he started wearing full sets of dentures made from ivory and human teeth.

"Dr Lemoire," Gehred said, was a reference to Dr Jean Le Mayeur, one of Washington's dentists, with whom he subsequently corresponded about purchasing a set of dentures. There's no way to be sure that the nine teeth bought from the slaves ended up in the dentures, Gehred said, but it's possible that Washington and a dentist struck a deal in which Washington would buy teeth at cut-rate prices from the people he owned in order to bring down the overall cost of the dentures.

Surviving newspapers feature ads by Le Mayeur seeking people willing to have their teeth pulled for cash; one, from Richmond in 1785, offers two guineas per front tooth, "slaves excepted." At that rate, the nine teeth bought from Washington's slaves should have cost 19 British pounds, Gehred said. Washington paid only about 6 pounds.


ARPANet

The Internet was originally called ARPANet (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network) designed by the US Department of Defense.

Read More
Australia or New Holland

Australia was originally called New Holland.

Read More
Tennis

Tennis was originally played with bare hands.

Read More
Mona Lisa

It took Leonardo Da Vinci 10 years to paint Mona Lisa.

Read More