Typhoid Mary

Typhoid Mary


The famed "Typhoid Mary" infected more than 50 people by cooking for them.


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Typhoid Mary, byname of Mary Mallon, (born September 23, 1869, Cookstown, County Tyrone, Ireland and died November 11, 1938, North Brother Island, Bronx, New York, U.S.), famous typhoid carrier who allegedly gave rise to multiple outbreaks of typhoid fever.

Mary immigrated to the United States in 1883 and subsequently made her living as a domestic servant, most often as a cook. It is not clear when she became a carrier of the typhoid bacterium (Salmonella typhi). However, from 1900 to 1907 nearly two dozen people fell ill with typhoid fever in households in New York City and Long Island where Mary worked.

In 1906, after six people in a household of 11 where Mary had worked in Oyster Bay, New York, became sick with typhoid, the homeowners hired New York City Department of Health sanitary engineer George Soper, whose specialty was studying typhoid fever epidemics, to investigate the outbreak. Other investigators were brought in as well and concluded that the outbreak likely was caused by contaminated water.

Mary continued to work as a cook, moving from household to household until 1907, when she resurfaced working in a Park Avenue home in Manhattan. The winter of that year, following an outbreak in the Manhattan household that involved a death from the disease, Soper met with Mary. He subsequently linked all 22 cases of typhoid fever that had been recorded in New York City and the Long Island area to Mary.

Again Mary fled, but authorities led by Soper finally overtook her and had her committed to an isolation center on North Brother Island, part of the Bronx, New York. There she stayed, despite an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, until 1910, when the health department released her on condition that she never again accept employment that involved the handling of food.

Fifty-one original cases of typhoid and three deaths were directly attributed to her (countless more were indirectly attributed), although she herself was immune to the typhoid bacillus.


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