Tuxedo

Tuxedo


Though many attribute the creation of the tuxedo to wealthy American aristocrats attending the Autumn Ball in Tuxedo Park, New York, the garment dates back to 1865.


share Share

Though many attribute the creation of the tuxedo to wealthy American aristocrats attending the Autumn Ball in Tuxedo Park, New York, the garment actually dates back to 1865 and Edward VII (then the Prince of Wales).

Savile Row tailor Henry Poole & Co., which is still in business today, fit the prince for an ensemble that was more formal than a lounge suit, but not without the trimmings of a tailcoat. (It was something the prince could wear in the dining room and informal settings.) His highness commissioned it in blue with matching pants and the "dinner jacket" — as the tuxedo was called back then — took off.

At this time, the jacket was usually black, shawl collared, and accompanied by white accessories.

The prince sent Potter to be fitted for the popular new jacket and Potter later wore it to the Autumn Ball of a private country club in Tuxedo Park, New York. There, the American moniker of the suit was popularized.

By the early 20th century, the dinner jacket had risen in popularity and was acceptable in formal situations. Black accessories and a peaked lapel were also de rigueur.


 First Fashion Magazine 

The first-ever fashion magazine was made for men by a man.

Read More
World's Oldest Dress

The world's oldest woven garment, called the Tarkhan Dress dates back more than 5,000 years.

Read More
The First Step to Modern Swimwear

In 1907, a woman was arrested on a beach in Boston for wearing a one-piece swimsuit.

Read More
 Longest Wedding Dress

The world's longest wedding dress train is 1.85 miles long.

Read More