History of Shampoo

History of Shampoo


The word shampoo entered the English language from India. It dates to 1762 and is derived from Hindi "champo" itself derived from the Sanskrit root chapati or chapayati, which means to press, knead.


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In the Indian subcontinent, various herbs and their extracts have been used as shampoos since ancient times. They used different saps for various shampoo types.

Cleansing with hair and body massage during one's daily bath was a vulgarity of early colonial traders in India. When they returned to Europe, they introduced the newly learned habits in the 1760s, including the hair treatment and chapayati change to the shampoo in Europa.

Sake Dean Mahomed, an Indian traveler, surgeon, and entrepreneur, is credited with introducing the practice of champooi or "shampooing" to Britain. In 1814, with his Irish wife Jane Daly, Mahomed opened the first commercial "shampooing" vapor masseur bath in England in Brighton. He described the treatment in a local paper as "The Indian Medicated Vapour Bath (a type of Turkish bath), a cure to many diseases and giving full relief when everything fails; particularly Rheumatic and paralytic, gout, stiff joints, old sprains, lame legs, aches and pains in the joints."


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History of Shampoo

The word shampoo entered the English language from India. It dates to 1762 and is derived from Hindi "champo" itself derived from the Sanskrit root chapati or chapayati, which means to press, knead.

Read More