Beethoven's Greatest Works

Beethoven's Greatest Works


By 1820, when he was almost deaf, Beethoven composed his greatest works.


share Share

"For the last three years my hearing has grown steadily weaker..." - so wrote Beethoven, aged 30, in a letter to a friend.

The young Beethoven was known as the most important musician since Mozart. By his mid-20s, he had studied with Haydn and was celebrated as a brilliant, virtuoso pianist.

By the time he turned 30 he had composed a couple of piano concertos, six string quartets, and his first symphony. Everything was looking pretty good for the guy, with the prospect of a long, successful career ahead.

Then, he started to notice a buzzing sound in his ears - and everything was about to change.

By 1820, Beethoven was almost totally deaf but he composed his greatest works during this period.


William Shockley

William Shockley, who won the 1956 Nobel in physics for inventing the transistor, was excluded as a child from a long-term study of genius because of his I.Q. the score wasn't high enough.

Read More
Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo spent much of her life in bed suffering from severe pain. Even so, she became one of the most famous artists of all time and an icon of the twentieth century.

Read More
Beethoven's Greatest Works

By 1820, when he was almost deaf, Beethoven composed his greatest works.

Read More
John Nash

John Nash, an American mathematician whose life, marked by acute paranoid schizophrenia, fought against his disease and developed a successful academic career that earned him the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1994.

Read More