Daylight Saving Time

Daylight Saving Time


Germany was the first country ever to implement Daylight Saving Time to save energy during WW1.


share Share

Daylight saving time (DST), also daylight savings time or daylight time (United States) and summer time (United Kingdom, European Union, and others), is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that darkness falls later each day according to the clock. A common implementation of DST is to set clocks forward by one hour in the spring ("spring forward") and set clocks back by one hour in autumn ("fall back") to return to standard time. In other words, there is one 23-hour day in late winter or early spring and one 25-hour day in the fall.

George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895. The German Empire and Austria-Hungary organized the first nationwide implementation starting on April 30, 1916. Many countries have used it at various times since then, particularly since the 1970s energy crisis. DST is generally not observed near the equator, where sunrise times do not vary enough to justify it. Some countries observe it only in some regions; for example, parts of Australia observe it, while other parts do not. Only a minority of the world's population uses DST; Asia and Africa generally do not observe it.

DST clock shifts sometimes complicate timekeeping and can disrupt travel, billing, record keeping, medical devices, heavy equipment, and sleep patterns. Computer software often adjusts clocks automatically, but policy changes by various jurisdictions of DST dates and timings may be confusing.


WW1 Effects

World War I is one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war.

Read More
Zimmermann Telegram

Most historians agree that American involvement in WW1 was inevitable by early 1917, but the march to war was accelerated by a letter penned by German foreign secretary Arthur Zimmermann.

Read More
Liberty Sandwiches

During WW1, the U.S. Government tried to rename hamburgers as "liberty sandwiches" to promote patriotism.

Read More
The Schlieffen Plan

The Schlieffen Plan, devised a decade before the start of WW1, outlined a strategy for Germany to avoid fighting at its eastern and western fronts simultaneously.

Read More