Liberty Sandwiches

Liberty Sandwiches


During WW1, the U.S. Government tried to rename hamburgers as "liberty sandwiches" to promote patriotism.


share Share

In World War I, Germany was considered the main culprit and provacateur of the war. Therefore, it stirred the movement against Germans in United States. Prior to the war, German-Americans were able to express and promote their ethnic culture through the fine arts and language. Once the war began, German-Americans came under public scrutiny and ostracism. To raise support for the war, German culture was belittled to establish the notion of superiority of America. Any traces of German culture was erased in America. For example, instead of saying "hamburger," which has German roots, it was called "liberty sandwich."

I thought Foner did a good job in presenting the Anti-German Crusade. He stated several statistics to demonstrate how the war negatively affected German-Americans and their culture. However, Foner could have developed and expanded the topic more to illustrate the hardships of German-Americans during the war. The three images above adds depth to the portrayal of how German-Americans were singled out and excluded from mainstream America.


WW1 Effects

World War I is one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war.

Read More
Zimmermann Telegram

Most historians agree that American involvement in WW1 was inevitable by early 1917, but the march to war was accelerated by a letter penned by German foreign secretary Arthur Zimmermann.

Read More
Liberty Sandwiches

During WW1, the U.S. Government tried to rename hamburgers as "liberty sandwiches" to promote patriotism.

Read More
The Schlieffen Plan

The Schlieffen Plan, devised a decade before the start of WW1, outlined a strategy for Germany to avoid fighting at its eastern and western fronts simultaneously.

Read More