WW1 Effects

WW1 Effects


World War I is one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war.


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World War I (often abbreviated as WWI or WW1), also known as the First World War, the Great War, the Seminal Catastrophe, and initially in North America as the European War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918.

Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the resulting 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

The term "First World War" was first used in September 1914 by German biologist and philosopher Ernst Haeckel, who claimed that "there is no doubt that the course and character of the feared 'European War' ... will become the first world war in the full sense of the word," citing a wire service report in The Indianapolis Star on 20 September 1914.

Prior to World War II, the events of 1914–1918 were generally known as the Great War or simply the World War. In October 1914, the Canadian magazine Maclean's wrote, "Some wars name themselves. This is the Great War." Contemporary Europeans also referred to it as "the war to end war" or "the war to end all wars" due to their perception of its then-unparalleled scale and devastation. After World War II began in 1939, the terms became more standard, with British Empire historians, including Canadians, favouring "The First World War" and Americans "World War I".


WW1 Effects

World War I is one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war.

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Zimmermann Telegram

Most historians agree that American involvement in WW1 was inevitable by early 1917, but the march to war was accelerated by a letter penned by German foreign secretary Arthur Zimmermann.

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Liberty Sandwiches

During WW1, the U.S. Government tried to rename hamburgers as "liberty sandwiches" to promote patriotism.

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The Schlieffen Plan

The Schlieffen Plan, devised a decade before the start of WW1, outlined a strategy for Germany to avoid fighting at its eastern and western fronts simultaneously.

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