Next in Line Effect

Next in Line Effect


When you first meet people it is common to forget their names called the 'next-in-line' effect. This is because people are too worried about themselves, and what they'll say next.


share Share

Impaired recall for an event immediately preceding an anticipated public performance. The effect was first reported in 1973 by the US graduate student Malcolm Brenner (born 1946), who performed an experiment in which a group of participants sat around a circular table taking turns reading words aloud, trying to remember as many words as possible. After going around the table several times, so that each participant had read out several words and there were many more read out by others to remember, the participants' recall was tested.

Recall tended to be best for the words that the participants had read out themselves (the von Restorff effect) and worst for the words immediately preceding the words that they had read out (the next-in-line effect). The effect is believed to be due to both attention distraction and retrograde amnesia.


Oxygen Deprivation

Lack of oxygen in the brain for 5 to 10 minutes results in permanent brain damage.

Read More
Development of Brain

Your brain keeps developing until your late 40s.

Read More
Brain Connections

New brain connections are created every time you form a memory.

Read More
Brain's Oxygen Usage

Your brain uses 20% of the total oxygen and blood in your body.

Read More