Operation Paperclip

Operation Paperclip


After WW2, 1,500 German scientists were given amnesty on the condition that they work for the U.S. government.


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The atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki may have put an end to World War II, but they weren't the only destructive weaponry developed during the war. From nerve and disease agents to the feared and coveted V-1 and V-2 rockets, Nazi scientists worked on an impressive arsenal.

As the war came to a close in 1945, both American and Russian officials began scheming to get that technology for themselves. So it came to pass that 71 years ago today, 88 Nazi scientists arrived in the United States and were promptly put to work for Uncle Sam under a project known as "Operation Paperclip."

While many of the men who were brought to the U.S. under the program were undoubtedly instrumental in scientific advancements like the Apollo program, they were also supportive and responsible for some of the horrors experienced by victims of the Holocaust. Operation Paperclip has certainly left a questionable legacy.


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