Naps, Meditation and Nature Walks

Naps, Meditation and Nature Walks


Research on naps, meditation, and nature walks reveals that mental breaks increase productivity, replenish attention, solidify memories, and encourage creativity.


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Freelance writer and meditation teacher Michael Taft has experienced his version of cerebral congestion."In a normal working day in modern America, there's a sense of so much coming at you at once, so much to process that you just can't deal with it all" Taft says. In 2011, while finalizing plans to move from Los Angeles to San Francisco, he decided to take an especially long recess from work and the usual frenzy of life. After selling his home and packing all his belongings in storage, he traveled to the small rural community of Barre, Mass., about 100 kilometers west of Boston, where every year people congregate for a three-month-long "meditation marathon."

Taft had been on similar retreats before, but never one this long. For 92 days he lived at Insight Meditation Society's Forest Refuge facility, never speaking a word to anyone else. He spent most of his time meditating, practicing yoga, and walking through fields and along trails in surrounding farmland and woods, where he encountered rafters of turkeys leaping from branches, and once spotted an otter gamboling in a swamp. Gradually, his mind seemed to sort through a backlog of unprocessed data and to empty itself of accumulated concerns. "When you go on a long retreat like that there's a kind of base level of mental tension and busyness that evaporates," Taft says. "I call that my 'mind being not full.' Currently, the speed of life doesn't allow enough interstitial time for things to just kind of settle down."


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