Crying In Space

Crying In Space


If you cry in space the tears just stick to your face.


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Clayton C. Anderson, a NASA astronaut, had this to say about his experience up in space: “I cried in space several times… due to some very emotional circumstances. Crying is exactly the same as here on Earth, except the tears, don’t fall down, as there is no gravity. Not a big deal at all… the emotions I experienced, however, were a big deal.”?
So, we know from firsthand experience that tears don’t fall. But the question is, do tears form at all in zero gravity? Well, tears are formed in small almond-shaped glands along the eyes known as lachrymal glands. Lacrima, quite fittingly, is Latin for a tear. These glands produce a thin aqueous layer in front of our eyes to keep them moist, but they’re also the source of our tears. We do not stop producing tears in space, although astronauts sometimes feel dryness in the eyes due to the clinical conditions aboard the ISS. In other words, if you’re ever up there, you can definitely shed a tear; either at the immense beauty of the earth or at your extreme loneliness.


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