How Hot is the Sun?

How Hot is the Sun?


The center of the Sun is about 27 million degrees Fahrenheit (15 million C).


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Huge energy- and light-producing sphere of glowing gases, the sun makes life on Earth possible. The temperature of our nearest star varies tremendously, and not in ways you might realize. So, how hot is the sun?

At the core of the sun, gravitational attraction produces immense pressure and temperature, which can reach more than 27 million degrees Fahrenheit (15 million degrees Celsius). Hydrogen atoms get compressed and fuse together, creating helium. This process is called nuclear fusion.

Nuclear fusion produces huge amounts of energy. The energy radiates outward to the sun's surface, atmosphere, and beyond. From the core, energy moves to the radiative zone, where it bounces around for up to 1 million years before moving up to the convective zone, the upper layer of the sun's interior. The temperature here drops below 3.5 million degrees F (2 million degrees C). Large bubbles of hot plasma form a soup of ionized atoms and move upward to the photosphere.


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