Formation of Water

Formation of Water


When hydrogen burns in the air, water is formed.


share Share

What hydrogen releases upon burning depends on its environment and the type of burning it goes through. There are generally two ways hydrogen can burn: It can be used in nuclear fusion, in powerful reactions such as the ones that cause stars to burn, or it can combust on earth with the help of the oxygen-rich atmosphere. On earth, hydrogen can be found in many different substances, but pure hydrogen acts a particular way and only emits certain particles when burned.

Hydrogen is considered the most common chemical element in existence and is responsible for a large amount of the heat that exists in the universe. In nuclear reactions, especially those that power the sun and other stars, hydrogen is put under tremendous pressure until it releases a large amount of heat and light; it then reforms into other elements. The nuclear reaction uses up the hydrogen atom and fuses the leftover parts of several hydrogen atoms into a helium atom. This process actually changes depending on the size of the star, but helium is still the primary element produced. Other particles are also produced in smaller amounts, not unlike ashes left over from the nuclear fusion; these particles may eventually come together and create a neutron star after all the hydrogen and helium are gone.

On earth, hydrogen does not go through the nuclear-reaction process at all unless forced to inside an atomic bomb. Instead, the atoms burn in a completely different way, similar to how hydrocarbon fuels burn, but in a purer form. Like carbon-based fuels, pure hydrogen reacts with the air around it to combust and produces a large amount of heat as energy. Unlike the more common fuels, pure hydrogen does not leave behind many extra or contaminant particles.


Plant Life in Ocean

85% of plant life is found in the ocean.

Read More
Grasshopper Blood

Grasshoppers have transparent (colorless) blood.

Read More
Meterorites

Over 500 meteorites hit the Earth each year.

Read More
Earthquakes

The Earth experiences over 12000-14000 earthquakes a year.

Read More